Fisherman’s soap

Difficulty: Intermediate
Time: 1 hr
Yields: 5 cubes of soap

Did you know that aniseed oil is banned from fishing competitions in certain countries, because it is said to give an unfair advantage to those using it? Apparently, aniseed oil has a particular chemical composition which acts as a fish attractant. In New Zealand, it is banned from being used as bait scent when fresh water fishing. So what better gift could you think of giving your fishing buddy than this Fisherman’s Soap, which will even lather in seawater? Washing your hands and equipment with this aniseed and lemon scented soap will mask the human scent, perfect for sneaking up on the fish!

Only soaps that are made with 100% coconut oil will manage to lather in seawater. However, pure coconut oil soaps can be drying to your skin, to prevent this, I have calculated a 15% superfatting ratio into the recipe, meaning that 15% of the oils are not saponified (turned into soap),and thus creating a slightly milder soap.

If you have never made cold-process soap before, I strongly suggest you check out the basic cold process soap tutorial first.

Before starting, please read the safety and precautions post, especially since this tutorial requires the handling of caustic soda!

ONE: First, prepare your lye. Weigh out the caustic soda in a small container. Measure the water in a small pyrex or other heat proof glass jug. Then carefully add the caustic soda to the water and gently stir until all the caustic soda has dissolved. Set aside to cool.

TWO: Weigh out the coconut oil in a pyrex jug and heat in microwave on high for one minute or until melted. Set aside to cool.

 

THREE: When both the lye and oil have cooled down to room temperature, around 25C (77F), carefully pour the lye into the oil. Give the mixture a few pulses with the stick blender.

FOUR: Add the lemon and aniseed essential oils and continue stick blending until you reach trace.

 

 

FIVE: Next, add the poppy seeds and, using a whisk or spatula, stir to mix the seeds throughout the soap.

SIX: Pour the soap into the mold. I’m using a 9-cube silicon soap mold and the soap will fill 5 cavities, giving me approximately five 100 g soap cubes. Leave the soap in the mold overnight.

SEVEN: The following day, carefully unmold the soap and leave them to cure for another 4 weeks.


Fisherman’s soap

Ingredients

  • 400 g coconut oil
  • 62 g caustic soda
  • 100 ml water
  • 10 ml aniseed essential oil
  • 10 ml lemon essential oil
  • 1 tablespoon poppy seeds

Before starting, make sure you wear protective goggles and gloves and work in a well-ventilated area, free from any distractions!

Instructions

  1. Prepare your lye: carefully add the caustic soda to the water and stir gently until all the caustic soda has dissolved. Set aside to cool.
  2. Weigh out the coconut oil in a pyrex jug and heat in the microwave on high for 1 minute or until melted. Set aside to cool.
  3. When both the lye and the coconut oil have cooled down to room temperature, approximately 25C (77F), carefully add the lye to the oil and stick blend briefly.
  4. Add the essential oils and continue stick blending until you reach trace.
  5. Add the poppy seeds and stir them through the soap.
  6. Pour the soap into the mold, and leave to cure overnight.
  7. The next day, unmold and leave to cure for a further 4 weeks.

Author: Jackie

Mum, blogger, soap maker, frequent flyer!

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