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Easter egg bath bombs

Difficulty: Beginner
Time: 30 minutes
Yields: 5-6 eggs

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Here’s another alternative to sugary sweet treats at Easter. Don’t get me wrong, we do lots of chocolate and hot cross buns and other sweets, but sometimes it does get a bit too much, and kids love fizzy bath bombs or a fun little soap (check out these Easter treats).

The Easter egg bath bombs are quick and easy to make, even for children, and you don’t need a lot of ingredients. The baking soda and citric acid you can get from your supermarket (although it’s cheaper to buy them in bulk from Pure Nature), and you probably already have some essential oils or fragrance, and micas at home from your other projects. The only other (optional but highly recommended) ingredient is polysorbate 80, and emulsifier.

To make the Easter egg shapes, I used these plastic egg shells that I found at Look Sharp, but I’m sure craft stores probably stock these around Easter as well. I think they’re used as some kind of hanging decorations, but they work perfect as bath bomb molds. I paid $3 for 6, so they’re not very expensive either.

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The following instructions are for one lot of eggs, approximately 5 or 6. I made a different lot for each colour, 5 in total. That’s a lot of eggs. If you don’t want that many eggs, you can split the batch into two or three before you add the mica and then colour each portion a different colour.

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ONE: Add one cup of baking soda and a half cup of citric acid to a bowl. Wearing disposable gloves and using your hands, mix thoroughly and break up any clumps.

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TWO: Next, add one tablespoon of sweet almond oil (alternatively use another vegetable oil, such as rice bran oil), and half a tablespoon of polysorbate 80. And again mix thoroughly.

Polysorbate 80 is a natural vegetable sourced emulsifier, which helps disperse the oil and the mica in the bath water, instead of floating on the surface and leaving greasy colour rings on the sides of the bath tub. It’s not a necessary ingredient to make bath bombs, and if you don’t have it, you can leave it out, but I find it does make the bath bombs better.

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THREE: Add 1/2 teaspoon fragrance or essential oil blend. Because I’m making these for children, I’m using slightly less fragrance than I usually would. Make sure that the fragrance or essential oil is safe to use in bath products and for children. Safe essential oils are sweet orange, pink grapefruit and lavender essential oil. Alternatively, Candlescience fragrances has some great skin-safe fragrances that are popular with kids, such as watermelon, fruit slices, mango and tangerine, and strawberry shortcake.

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FOUR: Lastly, add 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon of mica to the mixture and using your hand, mix it thoroughly until all the colour is evenly distributed throughout. The micas I’m using here are shimmer green, coral reef, silken violet and sweetheart rose from Pure Nature.

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FIVE: Check the mixture. The consistency of the bath bomb mixture should be so that when you squeeze the mixture in your fist it holds its shape when you open your hand. If necessary spritz a little water on it and work the moisture into the mixture with your hands. You want the mixture to be just moist enough so that the mixture sticks together and doesn’t crumble apart. But be careful  if you spritz too much, the mixture will begin to fizz prematurely and ruin your bath bombs!

SIX: Once you have the right consistency,  scoop the bath bomb mixture into the two halves of the eggs and squeeze them together. Then carefully remove one half, and even more carefully tip the bath bomb into your hand.

SEVEN: Place them on a sheet of baking paper and allow them to fully dry out overnight. Anywhere dry and out of the way. I just left mine on the kitchen counter until the next morning.

If you are making more than one colour, repeat steps 1 to 7 for each colour.

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EIGHT: The following day, place the eggs in an egg carton, or wrap them in cling foil, or package them in cellophane bags. Ideally they should be wrapped as the humid climate of New Zealand will make your bath bombs quickly lose their fizziness.

Easter egg bath bombs

  • Difficulty: beginners
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Ingredients

  • 1 cup baking soda
  • 1/2 cup citric acid
  • 1 tablespoon sweet almond oil
  • 1/2 tablespoon polysorbate 80
  • mica in your desired colour
  • 1/2 teaspoon essential oil or fragrance
  • spray bottle with water

Directions

  1. Add baking soda and citric acid in a large bowl and mix to combine. Wearing gloves, use your fingers to break up any clumps.
  2. Add the sweet almond oil  and polysorbate 80 and mix it into the dry ingredients.
  3. Add your chosen fragrance or essential oil.
  4. Add 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon of mica and mix well so that all the colour and fragrance is dispersed throughout the mixture.
  5. Check your mixture. If necessary, spritz the bath bombs with a little water. The bath bomb mixture should be wet enough so that when you squeeze the mixture in your fist it holds its shape when you open your hand. You want to spray enough so that the mixture sticks together and doesn’t crumble apart, but  if you spray too much, the mixture will begin to fizz prematurely and ruin your bath bombs!
  6. Once you have the right consistency,  scoop the bath bomb mixture into the two halves of the egg mold and press them together firmly.
  7. Carefully remove one half and then tip the egg gently onto your palm.
  8. Place the eggs on a sheet of baking paper, and allow them to fully dry out overnight.
  9. The following day,  place them in egg cartons or wrap them in cling foil, or package them in cellophane bags. Ideally, they should be wrapped as the humid climate of New Zealand will make your bath bombs quickly lose their fizziness.

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Easter treats MP soap

Difficulty: Beginners
Time: 30 mins

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I was asked by my sister if we could bring something else than chocolate to our family Easter brunch, because her two young children, my one year old nephew and three year old niece, get so much during Easter, and they can’t (or shouldn’t) eat it all. And I get it. The kids are so little and everyone just wants to get them something, and at Easter, what else is there but chocolate easter bunnies and eggs? So I decided to come up with some alternative treats that kids will love, and here’s the first one: cute little Easter melt and pour soaps!

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To make these you’ll need an Easter themed mold. You can get these from the local craft shop, homeware stores, or somewhere like The Warehouse or K-mart, and are sold either as chocolate molds or ice cube molds. I got mine from The Warehouse a few years back, thinking they might come in handy one day, and they sure did today!

The other material you need is a melt and pour base, soap dye or food colouring, and a fragrance or essential oil. I’m using the low-sweat melt and pour base, which doesn’t attract moisture to its surface like most melt and pour soap bases, particularly here in New Zealand, where it can get quite muggy and humid at times.

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ONE: Cut the white melt and pour soap base into small cubes and add them to a heat proof Pyrex jug. Heat on high in the microwave in 10 second bursts until the soap has melted.

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TWO: Add one or two drops of soap dye or food colouring and stir. You can add more colour, one drop at a time, until the soap has reached the desired shade of the colour. I’m using the soap dye from Pure Nature here, which comes in five different colours (yellow, orange, red, blue and green), which have been especially prepared for melt and pour soap. Because my mold has different shapes, I do one colour per shape at a time: yellow for the ducks, blue for the rabbits, and green and pink for the eggs.

Remember that when you colour white melt and pour soap, the colours will always be pastels, because of the white base. If you want full, bright coloured soap, you’ll have to use clear melt and pour.

THREE: After you’ve reached the desired colour, add your fragrance or essential oil and stir well. I’m using sparkling pomelo from Candlescience fragrances, which is a fresh, fruity citrus-like skin-safe fragrance, and I thought would appeal to the kids (and adults!). The rule of thumb is about 1/8 teaspoon (or roughly 10-15 drops) of fragrance per 1/2 cup of melt and pour soap.

Make sure the fragrance you are using is safe to use on skin, and if you are not sure, check with the supplier. This is particularly important if you are planning on using candle fragrances.

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FOUR: Pour the soap into the cavities of the mold and spritz the surface with alcohol to get rid of any pesky little bubbles that might appear.

Another interesting advantage of the low-sweat melt and pour base I found is that it produces hardly any bubbles on the surface.

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FIVE: Let the soap cool down and harden completely before unmolding. And if you are doing several colours like me, make sure you check the last colour you poured, unless you want to end up with the same mess I did. Oops!

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If you have used the low-sweat melt and pour soap base, you have the advantage of being able to leave the soaps unwrapped. Otherwise, you’ll have to wrap the soaps in cling foil or put them into little cello bags to prevent ‘sweating’ – moisture condensing on the soap.

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You can add these little treats to your Easter baskets, put them in little cello bags or use them as little decorations. I’ve added a few of the soaps into little plastic egg shells with a bit of coloured shredded paper. Do you think the kids will like it?

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Easter treats MP soap

  • Difficulty: Beginners
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Ingredients

  • white melt and pour base (I prefer low-sweat for this project)
  • soap dye or food colouring
  • fragrance or essential oil
  • Easter themed mold
  • 99% isopropyl alcohol

Directions

  1. Cut the white melt and pour soap base into small cubes and place in a heat proof Pyrex jug.
  2. Heat the soap base in the microwave on high in 10 second bursts until melted.
  3. Add a drop or two of soap dye or food colouring and stir. Add a drop more at a time until you have reached the desired colour.
  4. For each 1/2 cup of soap, add about 1/8 teaspoon (10-15 drops) of fragrance or essential oil, and stir well.
  5. Carefully pour the soap into the cavities of the soap mold, and spray with alcohol to get rid of all the bubbles.
  6. Leave to cool down and harden completely before unmolding. If you are using low-sweat melt and pour soap, you can leave them unwrapped, otherwise wrap them in cling foil or put them in little cello bags.

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Coconut and lime MP soap

Difficulty: Intermediate
Time: 2
 hrs
Yields: 4 bars of soap

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Let your senses take you on tropical vacation next time you shower. This soap is scented with the smooth fragrance of coconut paired with refreshing lime, the perfect combination for island dreams! The layered design of the soap is softened by the crinkle cutter, giving the soap a cool wavy look.

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To make this soap you will need white and clear melt and pour soap base, a green and a blue mica, and the coconut lime fragrance from Candlescience. All the ingredients are available from Pure Nature. In addition, you will need the small square silicon soap mold or another square mold with approximately 500 ml volume, and a crinkle soap cutter.

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ONE: Cut the white melt and pour soap base into small cubes and add to a heat proof Pyrex jug. Heat on high in the microwave in 20 second bursts, until the soap has melted. Try to avoid the soap from reaching boiling point!

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TWO: Add 1/2 teaspoon of the coconut lime fragrance and stir well.

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THREE: Pour approximately 1/3 of the white soap into the mold.

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FOUR: Spritz the surface with 99% isopropyl alcohol. This is to disperse any bubbles, but also to prepare the surface, so that the next layer will adhere to it.

Let the soap cool down and solidify to the point where it will support the next layer, but has not yet completely hardened. Usually this is when the soap is still slight warm and when you gently press on it, it will leave a dent. The soap has to be hard enough so that the next layer will not push through the surface of the previous layer, and yet not too solid so that the two layers will fuse together.

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FIVE: Next, cut half of the clear melt and pour soap base into cubes and place them into another heat proof Pyrex jug. Again melt in the microwave in 20 second bursts until melted.

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SIX: Add about 1/4 teaspoon green mica and stir well. The mica I’m using here is Apple Green Mica from Pure Nature. You don’t need a lot of mica to colour clear soap base, but feel free to add a little more or less until you reach your desired colour.

SEVEN: Add 1/4 teaspoon of fragrance and give the soap another good stir, before carefully pouring it over the white layer. Spritz the soap with alcohol.

Again, wait for the green layer to harden sufficiently to hold the next layer, without it pushing through.

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EIGHT: Re-melt the white soap in the microwave in 20 second bursts and then pour it over the green layer. Spritz with alcohol.

NINE: Cut and melt the remaining clear soap, add 1/4 teaspoon of blue mica and 1/4 teaspoon of fragrance and carefully pour it over the white layer. Again spritz with alcohol.

For the blue layer, I’m using Blue Lustre Mica from Pure Nature, which is one of my favourite blues!

Wait for the blue layer to harden before proceeding.

TEN: Re-melt the remaining white soap and pour it over the blue layer. Spritz with alcohol to get rid of any air bubbles.

ELEVEN: Leave the soap to cool down and harden completely before unmolding. Using a crinkle cutter, cut a thin slice of two of the sides, and then cut the soap into 4 bars. This way you will get 4 bars which are wavy on both sides!

Troubleshooting: Because it’s tricky to get the exact right moment of pouring the layers, they can sometimes separate when cutting. If this happens, you can melt some clear soap base, and brush a thin layer of soap onto each end before sticking them together. Once the ‘glue’ has completely cooled down, you can carefully tidy up the soap using a knife.

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Because melt and pour soap bases contain a high amount of glycerin, they attract moisture and will ‘sweat’ if not wrapped. You can either place them into cellophane bags or wrap them into cling wrap to store them.

Coconut lime MP soap

  • Difficulty: Intermediate
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Ingredients

  • approx. 350 g white soap base
  • approx. 300 g clear soap base
  • green mica
  • blue mica
  • Coconut lime fragrance from Candlescience
  • small square silicon mold (500 ml)
  • 99% isopropyl alcohol

Directions

  1. Cut the white melt and pour soap base into small cubes and place in a heat proof Pyrex jug.
  2. Heat the soap base in the microwave on high in 20 second bursts until melted.
  3. Add 1/2 teaspoon of fragrance and stir well.
  4. Pour about 1/3 of the soap into the mold and spray the surface with isopropyl alcohol. Wait until the white soap has hardened sufficiently to hold the next layer.
  5. Cut half of the clear melt and our soap base into small cubes and place in another heat proof Pyrex jug.
  6. Heat in the microwave on 20 second bursts or until melted.
  7. Add approximately 1/4 teaspoon of apple green mica to the soap.
  8. Add 1/4 teaspoon of fragrance and stir well.
  9. Pour the green soap over the white layer, being careful as not to break through the surface of the white soap. Wait for the green layer to harden sufficiently to hold the next layer.
  10. Re-melt the white soap in the microwave in 20 second bursts until melted.
  11. Gently pour half of the remaining white soap over the green layer. Wait for the white layer to harden sufficiently to hold the next layer.
  12. Cut and melt the remaining clear soap.
  13. Add 1/4 teaspoon of magic blue mica and 1/4 teaspoon of fragrance and stir well.
  14. Carefully pour the blue soap over the white layer. Wait for the blue layer to harden sufficiently to hold the next layer.
  15. Re-melt the remaining white soap in the microwave and carefully pour it over the blue layer.
  16. Leave the soap to cool down and solidify completely before unmolding. Then using a crinkle cutter, cut a thin slice of the edges before cutting the soap into 4 bars.
  17. Store the soaps wrapped, either in clear cellophane bags or cling wrap.

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9 soap making tips to help you succeed!

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Making soap is not hard. It should be fun and definitely not stressful. The reason I decided to write about this topic this week is because I had several friends message me recently about problems they were having with their soap.

1. Start with easy projects

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Lavender Castile soap

I know it’s tempting to start off with something like the Dancing Funnel Technique but you really want your first soap making experiences to be a success. Start off with a simple soap recipe (like the basic cold process recipe) with a single fragrance or essential oil. Once you have understood and mastered the soap making process itself, you’ll find it easier to start adapting recipes and adding colour and changing the design of the soap.

Here are some other simple recipes to get you started with additives and colours.

And the same goes for more experienced soap makers: do a simple soap every now and then, just for the simplicity and the zen of making soap. I love making a single essential oil Castile soap. Instead of having to worry about intricate colour designs or advanced soap making techniques, I can just relax and enjoy the experience of making pure soap. I do them not only because these make for beautiful soaps, but it’s also a reminder that sometimes simple is enough.

2. Research the ingredients

Especially when using ingredients that you have never used before. Find out how they behave in soap. Will they react or discolour in hot/cold process soap? Are they suitable for melt and pour?

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Soap seizing due to the fragrance

It is important to understand the effect an ingredient can have on the soap making process and in the soap itself. Some fragrances, like those containing vanillin, will change the colour of your soap to a tan or brown colour. Other additives, especially fragrances, will accelerate the chemical reaction, which will make your soap thicken quickly and render it unsuitable for any colour work. Also find out how to use a particular ingredient. Different colourants, for example, will need different preparation before you can add it to your soap. Micas are best diluted in oils, whereas pigments are mixed with water. Other ingredients can change the oil/water ratio of your recipe. Fresh ingredients add additional water to the recipe, clays, on the other hand, absorb water.

Check out the following articles for more information:

3. Preparation, preparation, preparation!

I can’t emphasise this too much. The worst thing that can happen to a soap maker is having to prepare an ingredient while you’re soap is already at trace and thickening. Make sure you have all your ingredients and materials prepared and laid out, ready for use. Prepare your colours. Measure out your fragrances and essential oils. Pre-mix any additives, such as clays, that you will be using. One of my early mistakes was assuming I had enough oils for my soap, only to start measuring out and realising that I had run out of olive oil. Always prepare before you start soaping and don’t forget to have your equipment ready as well!

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Everything laid out and ready for my cupcakes!

4. Tick off all the ingredients as you go

Often I get a help message from a soap maker asking what to do when they have forgotten an ingredient. Fragrances and colourants don’t really matter, they’re just annoying if you left them out. Likewise other additives, such as sodium lactate or forgetting to spray the surface with alcohol, have little impact on your soap. However, forgetting to add one of the oils or fats, or adding them twice, can ruin the whole soap. Even after years of making soap, I will still tick off the ingredients I added as I go. It’s a habit that I follow religiously, because I can be quite scatter-brained and easily distracted. So being able to look at the recipe and see what I have and haven’t yet added helps me keep track and has saved me many, many times from making a bad mistake!

5. Forget temperature

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Adding the lye to the oils when both are roughly at room temperature.

My pet peeve in a lot of soap making literature is temperature. Having made soap for over 20 years and starting off without the cool soap books and websites that are around today, I learned a lot through trial and error. And let me tell you this, temperature was never a huge factor in my soap making. The one lesson I learned early on was to avoid heat! If I soaped too warm, all sorts of funny things would start to happen, which is why I soap at room temperature. So please relax and stop obsessing about temperature. Your lye and your oils don’t have to be at a certain temperature, and you’ll have perfectly good soap without the added stress of trying to get the temperature exactly right. Let both your oils and your lye cool down to approximate room temperature, which is when the outside of the oil and lye container will feel cool to touch or at most lukewarm. Cooler is better, especially when using ingredients such as sugar and milk.

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Goats milk soap

6. Patience!

I’m talking about curing time here. This is the most difficult part for any soap maker, as they will tell you, waiting for the soap to be ready. Unfortunately, soap is not something that will be ready the next day, unless you’re using a melt and pour soap base, or re-batching, but even then it will take a few weeks to be fully ready. The golden rule for hot and cold process soap is “the longer the curing time, the better the soap”. Soaps that haven’t had a full curing time, will still contain a little moisture, and such soaps end up getting mushy in your soap tray. You’ll find soaps that have had the longest time to cure will be the ones that are the hardest and longest lasting and the ones that remain nice in your soap tray. So be patient and leave those soaps to cure for months!

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Margarita soap

Tip: when I give away my soaps, I usually tell my friends to not use them straight away but place them where they keep their towels. That way their towels get to smell lovely and the soap gets additional curing time!

7. Keep a record of your soaps

One of the most annoying things that can happen is when you use one of your soaps, after having cured for half a year or so, and then absolutely loving it, but when you try and remember what you put in it, you find you lost the piece of paper you wrote the recipe on. Particularly, when you start experimenting and creating your own recipes, make sure you write it down. Not just the recipe, but the method (did you use a stick blender), how the soaping process went (did it accelerate or thicken too quickly), how the ingredients behaved (did the fragrance discolour the soap), and how it cured (how long, DOS, any discolouring?). These notes will help you for future recipes and will also be a record of how certain ingredients behaved in soap. Have a separate notebook, just for your soap making. Write down the date and the recipe and then keep adding notes as you check and use the soap.

8. Less but more often

A lot of soap makers don’t have special soap making rooms or areas and just make soap in their kitchen, as do I. And it seems logical to dedicate a whole afternoon or a day to just soap making, like having ‘baking days’ or ‘canning days’. But unlike baking or canning, making soap is actually a quick and easy thing to do. You don’t need an oven or a lot of equipment, there’s not a lot of preparation and apart from the cooling down of the lye and oils, it doesn’t take that much time either. So instead of making a lot of soap in one time, make smaller amounts but more often. I love preparing my lye and oils in the morning after everyone has left the house, and then I’ll do some blogging or writing (or housework), and about 1-2 hours later, I’ll go and make the soap, which should take no more than half an hour.

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My favourite soap mold is this 4-bar square silicon mold from Pure Nature.

Regular practice makes perfect, the saying goes, and by making soap more often but only a batch at a time, means you get more practice. After a long break from soap making, like my annual summer break, I always find I need a few batches to get back into it. Making a simple soap at least a couple of times during my break, keeps me from getting too ‘rusty’!

9. Don’t get discouraged

Thomas Edison never gave up. The story goes it took him over 10000 tries to invent the light bulb and when asked why he never gave up, he replied: “I didn’t fail. I just found 10000 ways that didn’t work.” I love reminding myself of this, when a soap doesn’t turn out the way I wanted it to.

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Don’t be afraid to try new techniques, experiment with new ingredients or play with a new idea. It might not turn out the first time, or even the second time, but you will learn from those experiences. Get up, brush off the disappointment and try again. Find out what went wrong and how you can improve it or avoid it. My biggest lessons in my soap making journey came from my failures, and I am willing to bet that every other soap maker will tell you exactly the same thing. So don’t get discouraged and don’t be afraid to fail. It’s all about the journey. Making soap should be an enjoyable, fun experience, regardless if you are making one small batch or hundred bars of soap at a time.

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Aargh, the dreaded soap ash!

And lastly, we are usually our worst critics. The soda ash on your soap? The glycerin rivers? Not quite the colours you were aiming for? What you see as a mistake, others won’t notice and they will love your soap! Trust me!

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Watermelon soap pops

Difficulty: Beginners
Time: 1
 hr
Yields: depends on the mold

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Remember the yummy popsicles our mum used to make when we were children? Deliciously refreshing and you’d have to warm them in your hands for a moment before you could pop them out of the plastic mold. These ice treats are making a comeback again, and unlike the boring round shapes we used to have, they come in all shapes and forms now, from little cute animals to sophisticated and elegant designs. And making popsicles isn’t just like adding your plain cordial and freezing them, it’s become quite the art form, with plenty of different (and healthy) recipes on the web. Check out this yummy Mango Chamomile popsicle recipe!

Inspired by the many creations on Pinterest and getting hold of this fun triangle shape mold, these Watermelon Pops are not only fun to look at, but they smell absolutely delicious! And they definitely need to come with a warning label: Not for eating!

For these soaps, you will use the crystal clear melt and pour soap base from SFIC, which gives the watermelon pops a very translucent appearance without any cloudiness you sometimes experience in clear melt and pour soap. You will also need white melt and pour soap base, Sweetheart Rose mica, Green Fruit mica, Watermelon fragrance from Candlescience, popsicle sticks and poppy seeds. You can get all, except for the poppy seeds and popsicle sticks, from Pure Nature. Popsicle sticks and poppy seeds you can buy from the supermarket.

About the molds: You can use any ice pop molds, but personally I prefer to use the silicon ones to the solid plastic ones, because they make it easier to unmold. You can buy ice pop molds at most homeware stores, and I’ve also seen them at The Warehouse, Farmers and some $2 shops. They’re fairly cheap. They come in different sizes and some make four and others more ice pops, so I didn’t give specific amounts of soap base to use. You’ll have to estimate how much you need for your molds.

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ONE: Cut enough clear melt and pour soap base into cubes for your mold and add to a heat proof Pyrex jug. Heat on high in the microwave in 10-20 second bursts, until the soap has melted. Try to avoid the soap from reaching boiling point!

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TWO: Add your mica and give it a good stir. I am using Sweetheart Rose mica from Pure Nature, which gave me the perfect shade of watermelon pink. I added only about 1/8 teaspoon for the half of cup of melted soap to get the colour I wanted. Add more or less to get your desired shade of pink.

THREE: Add your fragrance (rule of thumb is 1 teaspoon for each cup of melted soap) and sprinkle through some poppy seeds.

Note: additives, such as poppy seeds, in melt and pour soap bases will not mix evenly through the soap once it cools and usually congregate either on top or on the bottom, depending on its weight. This is due to the consistency of the melt and pour soap base. There are other more viscous soap bases, such as the crystal suspending soap base from Stephenson Personal Care, that are specially created to hold particles throughout the soap base.

FOUR: Pour the soap in your soap mold, and add a popsicle stick. To hold the popsicle stick in place I used a tie handle, which I tied around the stick.

Spritz the surface with isopropyl alcohol. This is to disperse any bubbles, but also to prepare the surface, so that the next layer will adhere to it.

Let the soap cool down and solidify to the point where it will support the next layer.

FIVE: Next, cut a little white melt and pour soap base, and melt it in the microwave for a about 10 seconds. You won’t need a lot, just enough for a thin line between the pink and green soap. To show you how little I needed for my four soaps, I used a small beaker to melt two cubes of white melt and pour soap base.

Make sure the soap is not too hot! The first time I did it, the white soap managed to break through the pink layer and you really want to avoid that. Once it’s relatively cool but still fluid, carefully pour a thin layer over the pink soap. If the tie handle is in the way, you should be able to remove it now.

Again, spritz the surface with alcohol and let it set before adding the next layer.

SIX: Next, cut some clear melt and pour soap and melt it in the microwave for only a very short time (10 seconds or so). Again you don’t need much, about twice as much as the white that you used previously.

SEVEN: Add a little bit of Green Fruit mica, enough to colour the soap green. And once the soap has cooled a little, so that it won’t melt the previous layer, carefully pour it over the white soap. Spritz with alcohol and let the soap set and cool down completely before unmolding.

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Because melt and pour soap bases contain a high amount of glycerin, they attract moisture and will ‘sweat’ if not wrapped. You can either place them into cellophane bags or wrap them into cling wrap to store them.

Watermelon soap pops

  • Difficulty: Beginners
  • Print

Ingredients

  • crystal clear melt and pour soap base
  • white melt and pour soap base
  • Sweetheart Rose mica
  • Green Fruit mica
  • Watermelon fragrance from Candlescience
  • popsicle mold
  • popsicle sticks
  • 99% isopropyl alcohol

Directions

  1. Cut the crystal clear melt and pour soap base into small cubes and melt in the microwave in 10-20 second bursts.
  2. Mix in Sweetheart Rose mica until you get your desired shade of pink.
  3. Add fragrance (1 teaspoon for each cup of soap) and poppy seeds and give it a good stir.
  4. Pour into the popsicle mold, and place the popsicle sticks in the soap. Use tie handles to keep the sticks in place. Spritz with alcohol. Wait until the soap has set before continuing.
  5. Cut and melt a little bit of the white melt and pour soap base, enough for a thin layer.
  6. Pour it over the pink layer and spritz with alcohol.
  7. Cut and melt some more crystal clear melt and pour soap base, approximately twice as much as the white soap you used in the previous step.
  8. Add a little Green Fruit mica and stir to mix the colour into the soap.
  9. Let the green soap cool a little before pouring it over the white layer. Spritz with alcohol.
  10. Leave the soap to set and cool down completely before unmolding.
  11. Store the soaps wrapped, either in clear cellophane bags or cling wrap.