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Natural feijoa lip scrub

Difficulty: Beginner
Time: 30 minutes
Yields: 4 pots (15 ml each)

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Lip scrubs are totally underrated in the skincare routine. We pamper, cleanse and protect our skin, but our lips often just get a lick of balm and that’s it. Regular exfoliation also benefit our lips, not only making them smooth for lipstick, but by removing dead skin cells, which helps keep lips soft and supple, retaining moisture and preventing cracked lips. Just like our skin needs looking after, so do our lips.

This feijoa lip scrub is made from only natural ingredients, including brown sugar, sweet almond oil, and ground dried feijoa fruit. The benefit of this recipe is it helps exfoliate by gently scrubbing, but the mild acidity (think AHA) from the feijoa also helps loosen the dead skin cells by dissolving the glue-like lipids holding them to the fresh, new skin cells underneath.

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To get the ground dried feijoa (the brown powder in the picture above), you can either use a food dehydrator, if you are lucky enough to have one, otherwise you can use the oven. For this tutorial, you only need one feijoa. Slice the fruit into 3-5 mm slices and place them on a baking tray lined with a sheet of baking paper, or ideally on a wire rack. Heat the oven to the minimum setting it has, usually around 60 degrees Celsius. Turn the slices over a couple of times during the dehydrating process. Depending on your oven, it can take about 4 hours for the fruit to completely dry out. If you don’t want the feijoa to go brown like mine (that’s just natural oxidation), you can dip them in a solution of 1 teaspoon of citric acid to one cup of water before dehydrating. Once dehydrated, grind the slices in a blender.

ONE: Add the dry ingredients, brown sugar and ground feijoa, to a small bowl.

TWO: Next, add the glycerin and sweet almond oil, and give everything a good stir.

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THREE: I’m adding one drop of spearmint essential oil and two drops of lemon essential oil to this scrub for a clean, refreshing fragrance, and because of its cooling, calming and antimicrobial properties, helping to keep your lips healthy.

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FOUR: Lastly, scoop the exfoliating scrub into the pots. Enjoy!

To use this yummy feijoa scrub, apply a generous amount to your lips and gently rub in circular motion without any pressure. Because the scrub also contains moisturising sweet almond oil, leave it on your lips for a minute or so to absorb the oil, and then using a damp cloth, gently wipe off. For the perfect kissable pout, exfoliate your lips once a week!

Natural feijoa lip scrub

  • Difficulty: beginners
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Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon ground dried feijoa
  • 1 tablespoon glycerin
  • 1 tablespoon sweet almond oil
  • 2 drops lemon essential oil
  • 1 drop spearmint essential oil
  • 4 lip balm pots (15 ml)

Directions

  1. Measure out the sugar and ground feijoa into a small bowl.
  2. Add the glycerin and sweet almond oil and stir until everything has been mixed thoroughly.
  3. Add the essential oils and give it another good stir.
  4. Scoop the exfoliating scrub into the pots. Enjoy!

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Coconut and feijoa lip balm

Difficulty: Beginner
Time: 30 minutes
Yields: 5 pots (15 ml each)

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Watch out, this coconut and feijoa flavoured lip balm is so yummy that you’ll want to eat it!

ONE: Measure out the coconut oil and beeswax in a small pot. If you want a vegan option, you can use candelilla wax instead. Heat on the stove on medium until the wax has fully melted and it is fully liquid.

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TWO: Take the pot of the stove and add the feijoa flavour oil. Make sure that the flavour oil you are using is lip-safe! Not all fragrances are approved for use on lips, even if they are safe for cosmetics! Check with the supplier if you are not sure.

If you like, you can also add a few drops of an oil-based sweetener. The lip balm will not taste like anything without sweetener, however, you are less likely to lick it off your lips if you leave it unsweetened!

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THREE: Pour the mixture carefully into your lip balm pots and leave them to cool down and harden completely before putting the lids on. If you put on the lids while balms are still warm, you risk getting condensation on the inside of the lids.

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Coconut and Feijoa Lip Balm

  • Difficulty: beginners
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Ingredients

  • 50 g coconut oil
  • 10 g beeswax
  • 2 ml lip-safe feijoa flavour oil
  • oil-based sweetener (optional)
  • 5 lip balm pots (15 ml)

Directions

  1. Measure out the coconut oil and beeswax in a small pot and heat on the stove on medium until fully liquid.
  2. Take the pot of the stove and add the flavour oil. If you wish, you can add a few drops of sweetener.
  3. Carefully pour the mixture in container and leave to harden and cool down completely before putting the lids on.

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Feijoa soap

Difficulty: Advanced
Time: 1 hr
Yields: 500 g soap

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Feijoas are great to add to your soaps for their exfoliant properties, both from the fruit itself but also from the texture of the flesh and seeds. You don’t have to worry about the fruit going bad in the soap, because the fruit, along with the oils and lye, will go through a saponification process in a high pH environment, and will keep anything from spoiling. However, there are a few things you need to take into account. Adding fruit will also add moisture, therefore to compensate for the extra moisture from the feijoa pulp that is added, you will use less water than usual to prepare you lye. Additionally, the extra sugar content can make your soap go through a hotter than usual gelling phase, so you will need to keep an eye on your soap during the first few hours.

If you have never made cold-process soap before, I strongly suggest you check out the basic cold process soap tutorial first.

Before starting, please read the safety and precautions post, especially since this tutorial requires the handling of caustic soda!

ONE: First, prepare your lye. Weigh out the caustic soda in a small container. As mentioned before, you are using less water than usual to prepare your lye to compensate for the extra moisture added from the fruit. The water discount in the recipe is 20 ml. Add 80 ml of water in a small pyrex or other heat proof glass jug, and then carefully add the caustic soda to the water and gently stir until all the caustic soda has dissolved. Set aside to cool.

While you are waiting for the lye to cool down, you can prepare your colour and feijoa pulp.

TWO: Scoop out the flesh of one large or two small feijoas, and set aside two tablespoons of pulp.

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THREE: In a small container, weigh out 15 ml of rice bran oil and add one teaspoon of green mica. I used Kelly Green Mica from Brambleberry (USA) here. Using a little whisk, mix the mica into the oil. If there are little clumps of mica at the surface, a spray of isopropyl alcohol will break them up.

Next, it’s time to get the oils ready.

FOUR: Weigh out the coconut oil in a pyrex jug and heat in microwave on high for one minute or until melted.

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FIVE: Add the remaining rice bran oil, olive oil and castor oil to the now melted coconut oil.

When the lye has cooled down to room temperature, add one teaspoon of sodium lactate to the lye and stir.

SIX: Make sure you are still in protective gear (goggles and gloves), carefully pour the lye to the oils, avoiding any splashes. Give it a quick pulse with the stick blender.

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SEVEN: Add the feijoa pulp and continue stick blending until light trace.

From this point on, you will have to work very quickly as the soap will thicken fast.

EIGHT: Next, pour in the colour/oil mixture and stir it until the colour is evenly dispersed into the soap.

NINE: Add the fragrance and stir using a whisk, rather than a stick blender, to prevent the soap from thickening even further.


TEN: Pour the soap into the mold.

Tap the mold gently on the bench a free times to get rid of any air bubbles.

ELEVEN: Leave to cure in the mold for a few days. Because of the added feijoa pulp, the soap will be softer than usual and need a bit more curing, especially if you have left out the sodium lactate.

TWELVE: When the soap has hardened enough to take out of the mold, cut it into 4 bars and leave them to cure for another 6-8 weeks.

Feijoa Soap

  • Difficulty: advanced
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Before starting, make sure you wear protective goggles and gloves and work in a well-ventilated area, free from any distractions!

Ingredients

  • 150 g olive oil
  • 130 g rice bran oil
  • 100 g coconut oil
  • 20 g castor oil
  • 55 g caustic soda
  • 80 ml water
  • 1 teaspoon sodium lactate
  • 2 tablespoons feijoa pulp
  • 20 ml feijoa fragrance
  • 1 teaspoon green mica

Directions

  1. Prepare your lye: carefully add the caustic soda to the water and stir gently until all the caustic soda has dissolved. Set aside to cool.
  2. While you wait for the lye to cool, scoop out the flesh from 1 large or 2 small feijoa. Set aside 2 tablespoons of fruit.
  3. In a small container, weigh out 15 ml of rice bran oil and add one teaspoon of green mica. Using a little whisk, mix the mica into the oil.
  4. Weigh out the coconut oil in a pyrex jug and heat in the microwave on high for 1 minute or until melted.
  5. Add the remaining rice bran oil, olive oil and castor oil to the now melted coconut oil.
  6. When the lye has cooled down to room temperature, stir in one teaspoon of sodium lactate. Then, carefully add the lye to the oils and stick blend briefly.
  7. Add the feijoa pulp and continue stick blending until light trace. From this point on, you will have to work very quickly as the soap will thicken fast.
  8. Add the colour solution and give it another quick pulse with the stick blender.
  9. Next, add your fragrance, and using a whisk (not stick blender), mix quickly to disperse the fragrance throughout the soap.
  10. Pour the soap into the mold and insulate the soap to ensure a gel phase. However, the soap will warm up quite a bit, so keep an eye on it during the first few hours.
  11. Leave to cure in the mold for a few days before removing it from the mold and cutting into 4 bars.
  12. Let the bars cure for another 6-8 weeks.

 

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Feijoa-scented bath bombs

Difficulty: Beginner
Time: 30 minutes
Yields: 6 bath bombs

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The fragrance of the feijoa is a very distinct fresh, tropical, fruity scent. Perfect for bath bombs! Besides the delicious fragrance, these bath bombs also contain nourishing mango butter to keep your skin hydrated and moisturised.

ONE: Using the standard 2:1 formula, add two cups of baking soda and one cup of citric acid to a bowl.

TWO: Measure out one tablespoon mango butter in a heat proof glass bowl or cup and melt it on high in the microwave for 2-3 minutes or until melted. Mango butter has a high melting point, so it might take a while. Usually, I will heat it in the microwave for 2 minutes on high and then let it sit for 2 minutes. If it still hasn’t melted, I’ll heat for another minute and then let it sit again.

THREE: Next, add one tablespoon of polysorbate 80 to the now-melted mango butter and stir well to combine the two. Polysorbate 80 will ensure that the mango butter will be fully dispersed into the bath water, instead of floating as little blobs on the surface of the water.

Pour the liquid into the dry ingredients, and, wearing disposable gloves to protect your hands and nails, mix everything and break up any clumps.

FOUR: Add the feijoa fragrance. Make sure the fragrance you are using is cosmetic grade, i.e. skin-safe! Candle fragrances are not always safe for use on skin, so check back with your supplier if you are not sure.

FIVE: Add a couple of drops of green colourant. You can use either a special bath bomb colourant or food colouring. Both will work. Rub the little blobs of colourant into the dry ingredients to disperse the colour throughout the bath bomb mixture.

Keep mixing with your hands. If necessary, spritz some water or witch hazel until you reach the right consistency. It should still be powdery, but if you squeeze some mixture in your hand, it should hold its shape.

SIX: Scoop the bath bomb mixture into your mold and press firmly to compact.

SEVEN: Let them dry in their molds for a few hours, then gently tap to remove them from their molds. Place them on a baking sheet and leave to harden completely overnight in a dry, warm place. I like using my hot water cupboard for this, because it’s the driest place in the house.

Feijoa-scented Bath Bombs

  • Difficulty: beginners
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Ingredients

  • 2 cups baking soda
  • 1 cup citric acid
  • 1 tablespoon mango butter
  • 1 tablespoon polysorbate 80
  • 6 ml skin-safe feijoa fragrance
  • green bath bomb colourant (or food colouring)

Directions

  1. Combine the baking soda and citric acid in a bowl.
  2. Measure out one tablespoon of mango butter in a heat proof glass bowl or cup and melt it on high in the microwave for 2 minutes or until melted.
  3. Add one tablespoon of polysorbate 80 to the now-liquid mango butter and stir to combine. Pour the liquid to the dry bath bomb mixture and, wearing disposable gloves,  mix everything together and break up any clumps.
  4. Add the skin-safe feijoa fragrance and mix.
  5. Using either bath bomb colourant or food colouring, add a few drops and keep mixing. If necessary, spritz some witch hazel or water to reach the right consistency.
  6. Scoop the bath bomb mixture into the mold and firmly press to compact.
  7. Let them dry for a few hours, then tap gently to remove them from the mold. Leave to harden completely overnight.