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Coconut rose body scrub

Difficulty: Beginners
Time: 15 min
Yields: 2 pots of about 125 ml each

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Not to toot my own horn, but I love, love, love this scrub! The combination of the Himalayan pink salt, coconut oil and rose petals leaves my skin feeling so smooth and clean, and yet also extremely soft and moisturised. And I love that I can use this and not have to worry about having to moisturise afterwards. Like most mums, I don’t have a lot of time to spend in the bathroom! I’m really amazed (and grateful) at how effective scrubs are and how simple and quick they are to make. I never used to use scrubs until I made the coffee scrub earlier this year, and now I can’t live shower without them!

Salt scrubs work by exfoliate your skin by removing the dead skin cells from the outer layer. This leaves your skin smooth, but without added oils, your skin would also feel tight and dry. Think of after swimming in the sea. The salt draws the moisture out of your skin. The coconut oil in the scrub will moisturise your skin, while the salt exfoliates, and the combination of the two is why your skin will feel so soft after using.

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ONE: Combine the Himalayan pink salt, one tablespoon of glycerin, and 1 tablespoon of coconut oil in a bowl and mix well. If the coconut oil is hard, melt it for a couple of seconds in the microwave. The glycerin is added to help emulsify the scrub when you rub it on your skin and make it more effective.

TWO: Add 5 drops of your favourite rose fragrance or essential oil and give it another good stir. I used Rose Anatolia oil, which smells absolutely divine!

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THREE: Sprinkle through some rose petals for decoration and fragrance. Both the salt and the glycerin will help preserve the colour, so unlike in soap, where the rose petals turn brown, these will keep their colour!

Scoop the mixture in a nice decorative pot and place the lid on. Because it will be used in the shower, look for a plastic or glass pot without a metal lid, or something that will not rust.

Regarding preservatives or the lack of it, both the salt and the glycerin are considered preservatives and will prevent mould and fungi, despite water coming in contact with it.

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Coconut rose scrub

  • Difficulty: beginners
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Ingredients

  • one cup of fine Himalayan pink salt
  • 1 tablespoon of glycerin
  • 1 tablespoon of coconut oil
  • 5 drops of rose oil
  • rose petals
  • 2 pots approx. 125 ml volume each

Directions

  1. Combine the salt, glycerin, coconut oil in a bowl and mix well. If the coconut oil is hard, melt it for a few seconds in the microwave before adding.
  2. Add 5 drops of rose oil and give it another good stir.
  3. Sprinkle through some rose petals and then scoop into pots. Enjoy!

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Roses soap

Difficulty: Advanced
Time: 1 hr
Yields: 1200 g of soap or 10 bars

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I love a good rose fragrance. I’d prefer the real thing, but pure rose essential oil is one of the most expensive oils there is, and to be honest, it would be a total waste to put it in a soap. Did you know that it takes about 20000 rose petals to produce 1 ml of rose oil! That’s when fragrances become a really good alternative.

The Rose fragrance I’m using in this soap is from Candlescience, available from Pure Nature, which has a beautiful rose aroma, with hints of geranium and violet. Unfortunately, it is also known to accelerate in cold process soap. And because of that, I was told it was unsuitable for cold process. But those of you who know me, know that I can never stay away from a challenge and, when you tell me that something isn’t possible, I have to go and prove you wrong. Working with accelerating fragrances isn’t impossible, but it is challenging.

Tips for working with accelerating fragrances:

 

  • Use slow moving oils such as olive oil, and stay away from butters and solid oils
  • Soap at low temperatures, no warmer than room temperature
  • Add your fragrance to the oils before adding the lye
  • Don’t add a water discount to your lye – less water means higher temperature, which increases acceleration
  • Stick to a simple soap design and avoid colour work

Instead of playing with colour, I decided to decorate the top instead. The curls I used for decoration I made from a previous soap, one I didn’t like how it turned out. Using a simple potato peeler, I peeled off curls from a bar of soap. It’s very easy, but you have to do it before the soap has become too hard and brittle. By the way, this is also a very cool way to use up the end-bits of soaps. I’m all for zero-waste, and that includes using every last bit of soap!

If you have never made cold-process soap before, I strongly suggest you check out the basic cold process soap tutorial first.

Before starting, please read the safety and precautions post, especially since this tutorial requires the handling of caustic soda!

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ONE: First, prepare your lye. Weigh out the caustic soda in a small container. Measure the water in a small pyrex or other heat proof glass jug. Then carefully add the caustic soda to the water and gently stir until all the caustic soda has dissolved. Set aside to cool. To help it cool down quicker, I placed mine in a container of cold water in the sink.

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TWO: Weigh out and add the olive oil and castor oil into a large jug or pot. Pure olive oil soaps usually have a poor lather, and castor oil will help increase the lathering properties.

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THREE: Add the fragrance to your oils and stir well until the fragrance is thoroughly dispersed through the oils. Adding the fragrance to the oils, dilutes the fragrance, which helps slow down acceleration.

Wait until the lye has cooled down to room temperature, or maximum 25C (77F).

FOUR: Making sure you are still in protective gear (goggles and gloves), carefully pour the lye to the oils, avoiding any splashes. Then, using only a whisk, stir briskly until the soap mixture has emulsified and starts to thicken.

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FIVE: Pour the soap quickly into the mold. The soap will start setting immediately, so you’ll have to work quickly.

SIX: Stick the soap curls into the top of the soap, leaving about half of the curl above the surface. Cover the whole surface with the curls. Make sure you work quickly, because the soap will set and it will become more difficult to push the curls in if it has set too hard.

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SEVEN: Sprinkle gold bio-glitter over the curls.

EIGHT: Let the soap harden overnight. The following day, carefully unmold the soap and cut into bars. Leave the bars to cure for a further 8 weeks.

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Roses soap

  • Difficulty: advanced
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Before starting, make sure you wear protective goggles and gloves and work in a well-ventilated area, free from any distractions!

Ingredients

  • 950 g olive oil
  • 50 g castor oil
  • 128 g caustic soda
  • 260 ml water
  • 40 ml Rose fragrance from Candlescience
  • rose coloured soap curls (optional)
  • gold bio-glitter (optional)

Directions

  1. Prepare your lye: carefully add the caustic soda to the water and stir gently until all the caustic soda has dissolved. Set aside to cool.
  2. Weigh out the oils in a large jug or pot.
  3. Add the fragrance to the oils and stir to disperse the fragrance through the oils
  4. Once the lye has cooled down to room temperature, carefully add it to the oils and, using only a whisk, stir until the soap starts to thicken.
  5. Pour into mold.
  6. Optional: stick curls into the surface of the soap, leaving about half of the curl above the soap. Cover the whole surface with curls
  7. Optional: sprinkle some gold bio-glitter over the curls
  8. Let the soap set and harden overnight. Unmold and cut into bars. Leave the bars to cure for a further 8 weeks.

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Shea butter and rose shower smoothie

Difficulty: Easy
Time: 30 minutes
Yields: 2 pots (250 ml)


Shower smoothies are whipped up foamy bath butter bases with added nourishing and conditioning ingredients, such as butters and oils, which makes them particularly mild and moisturising to your skin. They are also extremely convenient, because they cleanse Continue reading Shea butter and rose shower smoothie

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Rose geranium and shea butter soap

Difficulty: Intermediate
Time: 1 hr
Yields: 500 g soap

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Rose Geranium Soap

Rose geranium essential oil has a lovely fresh floral fragrance with a light citrus top note. Considered to be both calming and grounding, the uplifting scent helps reduce stress and worry, and this balancing effect extends to the skin, as it helps stabilise both oily and dry skin. Adding nourishing shea butter to the soap, it creates a wonderful bar of soap that leaves your skin clean and fresh, and yet without it being too drying for your skin.

If you have never made cold-process soap before, I strongly suggest you check out the basic cold process soap tutorial first.

Before starting, please read the safety and precautions post, especially since this tutorial requires the handling of caustic soda!

ONE: First, prepare your lye. Weigh out the caustic soda in a small container. Measure the water in a small pyrex or other heat proof glass jug. Then carefully add the caustic soda to the water and gently stir until all the caustic soda has dissolved. Stir one teaspoon of sodium lactate to make the soap harder. Set aside to cool.

TWO: Weigh out the shea butter and oils in a heat proof glass jug (i.e. Pyrex jug) and heat on high in the microwave for 1 minute or until the shea butter has fully melted. Set aside to cool.

Wait until both the oils and the lye have cooled down to room temperature, which is around 25C (77F).

THREE: Make sure you are still in protective gear (goggles and gloves), carefully pour the lye to the oils, avoiding any splashes. Give it a quick pulse with the stick blender.

FOUR: Add the rose geranium essential oil and give it a quick stir with the stick blender. Then keep alternatively pulsing (5-10 seconds) and stirring with the stick blender until you reach trace.

FIVE: Pour the soap into the mold, and then gently tap the mold on the bench a few times to get rid of any air bubbles in the soap. Scatter a few dried rose petals on the surface and then leave the soap to cure overnight or until it is hard enough to remove from the mold. Olive oil soaps tend to be a bit softer initially and take longer to harden.

SIX: Once the soap has hardened and doesn’t stick to the sides anymore, you can remove the soap from the mold. Let the soap cure for another couple of days before cutting into bars. The bars will then need at least 6-8 weeks to cure before they are ready to use.

Rose Geranium and Shea Butter Soap

  • Difficulty: intermediate
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Before starting, make sure you wear protective goggles and gloves and work in a well-ventilated area, free from any distractions!

Ingredients

  • 325 g olive oil
  • 50 g shea butter
  • 25 g castor oil
  • 51 g caustic soda
  • 100 ml water
  • 1 teaspoon sodium lactate
  • 20 ml rose geranium essential oil
  • dried rose petals

Directions

  1. repare your lye: carefully add the caustic soda to the water and stir gently until all the caustic soda has dissolved. Add one teaspoon of sodium lactate. Set aside to cool.
  2. Weigh out the shea butter and oils in a large heat proof glass jug and microwave on high for 1 minute or until the shea butter has fully melted. Set aside to cool.
  3. Once both the oils and the lye have cooled down to room temperature, carefully add the lye to the oils, without splashing, and give it a quick pulse with the stick blender.
  4. Add the rose geranium essential oil, and keep alternatively pulsing and stirring with the stick blender until trace.
  5. Pour the soap into the mold, and gently tap the mold on the bench a few times to get rid of any air bubbles in the soap. Scatter a few rose petals on the surface and then leave to cure overnight or until hard enough to remove from the mold.
  6. Once the soap is hard enough, remove the soap from the mold and let it cure for another couple of days before cutting into bars. The bars will need another 6-8 weeks to cure before they are ready.

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Rose and shea butter bath bombs

Difficulty: Beginner
Time: 30 minutes
Yields: 3-4 bath bombs

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A dear friend of mine had her 40th and I wanted to make her something special. Looking after kids all day, both as a mum and as her job, I felt she deserved a bit of a treat. What could be better than a long soak in nice, warm bath with a glass of bubbly, and listening to Coldplay? These luscious rose and shea butter bath bomb are just perfect for that.

According to Valerie Ann Worwood, in Aromatherapy for the Soul, the fragrance of rose vibrates with the energy of universal love, and encourages contentment, happiness, inner freedom and completeness.

To make these lush bath bombs, you will need baking soda, citric acid, shea butter, polysorbate 80, rose fragrance and rose petals, as well as your bath bomb molds (or alternatively you can use a muffin tray).

ONE: Combine your baking soda and citric acid in a bowl and mix with your hands. Make sure you break up any clumps.

TWO: In a small heat proof bowl or cup, heat some shea butter in your microwave until completely melted. Add two tablespoons of liquid shea butter to your baking soda/citric acid mixture.

THREE: Measure out your polysorbate 80 and fragrance and also add it to your mixture. Polysorbate 80 will make sure that the shea butter will be dispersed into your bath water, rather than float on top of the water.

FOUR: Spritz one or two squirts of water and start mixing everything with your hands to combine all the ingredients. I always wear gloves, even if I’m not mixing in any colour, because I find that my hands get really dry working with the raw mixture. Plus, if you’re wearing nail polish, the gloves will help protect your manicure! If you find the mixture isn’t holding well enough, spritz some more water, but be careful you don’t over-wet your bath bomb mixture. If it starts to fizz, you’ve definitely overdone it, and start adding baking soda and citric acid in a 2:1 ratio, until it stops fizzing.

FIVE: If you haven’t done so already, prepare your bath bomb molds. In one half mold, add a few rose petals to the centre of the mold and scoop the bath bomb mixture on top of them. Press the mixture into the mold to compact it. Next, fill the other half mold, but without adding any rose petals, and slightly overfill to help the two halves stick together.

Press the two halves together firmly without twisting them. Very gently remove one half (a light tap helps loosen the mold) and leave to dry for a few hours.

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After a few hours, carefully remove the bottom half mold, and place the bath bomb on a baking sheet. Leave to harden overnight in a warm, dry place. This is particularly important, if it’s a humid day, like we often have in New Zealand. I like putting mine in the hot water cupboard, which is the driest place in the house, and which ensures that my bath bombs always turn out. Enjoy!

Rose and Shea Butter Bath Bombs

  • Difficulty: beginners
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Ingredients

  • 2 cups baking soda
  • 1 cup citric acid
  • 2 tablespoons shea butter
  • 1 tablespoon polysorbate 80
  • 6 ml rose fragrance

Directions

  1. Combine the baking soda and citric acid in a bowl and using your hands mix and break up any clumps in the mixture.
  2. In a separate small heat proof bowl or cup, heat the shea butter in the microwave on high until fully melted and add to the mixture.
  3. Add the polysorbate 80 and fragrance.
  4. Mix everything with your hands and if necessary, spritz some water to reach the right consistency.
  5. Scoop into your bath bomb molds and let harden overnight before removing.