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Easter egg bath bombs

Difficulty: Beginner
Time: 30 minutes
Yields: 5-6 eggs

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Here’s another alternative to sugary sweet treats at Easter. Don’t get me wrong, we do lots of chocolate and hot cross buns and other sweets, but sometimes it does get a bit too much, and kids love fizzy bath bombs or a fun little soap (check out these Easter treats).

The Easter egg bath bombs are quick and easy to make, even for children, and you don’t need a lot of ingredients. The baking soda and citric acid you can get from your supermarket (although it’s cheaper to buy them in bulk from Pure Nature), and you probably already have some essential oils or fragrance, and micas at home from your other projects. The only other (optional but highly recommended) ingredient is polysorbate 80, and emulsifier.

To make the Easter egg shapes, I used these plastic egg shells that I found at Look Sharp, but I’m sure craft stores probably stock these around Easter as well. I think they’re used as some kind of hanging decorations, but they work perfect as bath bomb molds. I paid $3 for 6, so they’re not very expensive either.

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The following instructions are for one lot of eggs, approximately 5 or 6. I made a different lot for each colour, 5 in total. That’s a lot of eggs. If you don’t want that many eggs, you can split the batch into two or three before you add the mica and then colour each portion a different colour.

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ONE: Add one cup of baking soda and a half cup of citric acid to a bowl. Wearing disposable gloves and using your hands, mix thoroughly and break up any clumps.

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TWO: Next, add one tablespoon of sweet almond oil (alternatively use another vegetable oil, such as rice bran oil), and half a tablespoon of polysorbate 80. And again mix thoroughly.

Polysorbate 80 is a natural vegetable sourced emulsifier, which helps disperse the oil and the mica in the bath water, instead of floating on the surface and leaving greasy colour rings on the sides of the bath tub. It’s not a necessary ingredient to make bath bombs, and if you don’t have it, you can leave it out, but I find it does make the bath bombs better.

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THREE: Add 1/2 teaspoon fragrance or essential oil blend. Because I’m making these for children, I’m using slightly less fragrance than I usually would. Make sure that the fragrance or essential oil is safe to use in bath products and for children. Safe essential oils are sweet orange, pink grapefruit and lavender essential oil. Alternatively, Candlescience fragrances has some great skin-safe fragrances that are popular with kids, such as watermelon, fruit slices, mango and tangerine, and strawberry shortcake.

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FOUR: Lastly, add 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon of mica to the mixture and using your hand, mix it thoroughly until all the colour is evenly distributed throughout. The micas I’m using here are shimmer green, coral reef, silken violet and sweetheart rose from Pure Nature.

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FIVE: Check the mixture. The consistency of the bath bomb mixture should be so that when you squeeze the mixture in your fist it holds its shape when you open your hand. If necessary spritz a little water on it and work the moisture into the mixture with your hands. You want the mixture to be just moist enough so that the mixture sticks together and doesn’t crumble apart. But be careful  if you spritz too much, the mixture will begin to fizz prematurely and ruin your bath bombs!

SIX: Once you have the right consistency,  scoop the bath bomb mixture into the two halves of the eggs and squeeze them together. Then carefully remove one half, and even more carefully tip the bath bomb into your hand.

SEVEN: Place them on a sheet of baking paper and allow them to fully dry out overnight. Anywhere dry and out of the way. I just left mine on the kitchen counter until the next morning.

If you are making more than one colour, repeat steps 1 to 7 for each colour.

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EIGHT: The following day, place the eggs in an egg carton, or wrap them in cling foil, or package them in cellophane bags. Ideally they should be wrapped as the humid climate of New Zealand will make your bath bombs quickly lose their fizziness.

Easter egg bath bombs

  • Difficulty: beginners
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Ingredients

  • 1 cup baking soda
  • 1/2 cup citric acid
  • 1 tablespoon sweet almond oil
  • 1/2 tablespoon polysorbate 80
  • mica in your desired colour
  • 1/2 teaspoon essential oil or fragrance
  • spray bottle with water

Directions

  1. Add baking soda and citric acid in a large bowl and mix to combine. Wearing gloves, use your fingers to break up any clumps.
  2. Add the sweet almond oil  and polysorbate 80 and mix it into the dry ingredients.
  3. Add your chosen fragrance or essential oil.
  4. Add 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon of mica and mix well so that all the colour and fragrance is dispersed throughout the mixture.
  5. Check your mixture. If necessary, spritz the bath bombs with a little water. The bath bomb mixture should be wet enough so that when you squeeze the mixture in your fist it holds its shape when you open your hand. You want to spray enough so that the mixture sticks together and doesn’t crumble apart, but  if you spray too much, the mixture will begin to fizz prematurely and ruin your bath bombs!
  6. Once you have the right consistency,  scoop the bath bomb mixture into the two halves of the egg mold and press them together firmly.
  7. Carefully remove one half and then tip the egg gently onto your palm.
  8. Place the eggs on a sheet of baking paper, and allow them to fully dry out overnight.
  9. The following day,  place them in egg cartons or wrap them in cling foil, or package them in cellophane bags. Ideally, they should be wrapped as the humid climate of New Zealand will make your bath bombs quickly lose their fizziness.

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Easter treats MP soap

Difficulty: Beginners
Time: 30 mins

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I was asked by my sister if we could bring something else than chocolate to our family Easter brunch, because her two young children, my one year old nephew and three year old niece, get so much during Easter, and they can’t (or shouldn’t) eat it all. And I get it. The kids are so little and everyone just wants to get them something, and at Easter, what else is there but chocolate easter bunnies and eggs? So I decided to come up with some alternative treats that kids will love, and here’s the first one: cute little Easter melt and pour soaps!

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To make these you’ll need an Easter themed mold. You can get these from the local craft shop, homeware stores, or somewhere like The Warehouse or K-mart, and are sold either as chocolate molds or ice cube molds. I got mine from The Warehouse a few years back, thinking they might come in handy one day, and they sure did today!

The other material you need is a melt and pour base, soap dye or food colouring, and a fragrance or essential oil. I’m using the low-sweat melt and pour base, which doesn’t attract moisture to its surface like most melt and pour soap bases, particularly here in New Zealand, where it can get quite muggy and humid at times.

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ONE: Cut the white melt and pour soap base into small cubes and add them to a heat proof Pyrex jug. Heat on high in the microwave in 10 second bursts until the soap has melted.

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TWO: Add one or two drops of soap dye or food colouring and stir. You can add more colour, one drop at a time, until the soap has reached the desired shade of the colour. I’m using the soap dye from Pure Nature here, which comes in five different colours (yellow, orange, red, blue and green), which have been especially prepared for melt and pour soap. Because my mold has different shapes, I do one colour per shape at a time: yellow for the ducks, blue for the rabbits, and green and pink for the eggs.

Remember that when you colour white melt and pour soap, the colours will always be pastels, because of the white base. If you want full, bright coloured soap, you’ll have to use clear melt and pour.

THREE: After you’ve reached the desired colour, add your fragrance or essential oil and stir well. I’m using sparkling pomelo from Candlescience fragrances, which is a fresh, fruity citrus-like skin-safe fragrance, and I thought would appeal to the kids (and adults!). The rule of thumb is about 1/8 teaspoon (or roughly 10-15 drops) of fragrance per 1/2 cup of melt and pour soap.

Make sure the fragrance you are using is safe to use on skin, and if you are not sure, check with the supplier. This is particularly important if you are planning on using candle fragrances.

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FOUR: Pour the soap into the cavities of the mold and spritz the surface with alcohol to get rid of any pesky little bubbles that might appear.

Another interesting advantage of the low-sweat melt and pour base I found is that it produces hardly any bubbles on the surface.

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FIVE: Let the soap cool down and harden completely before unmolding. And if you are doing several colours like me, make sure you check the last colour you poured, unless you want to end up with the same mess I did. Oops!

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If you have used the low-sweat melt and pour soap base, you have the advantage of being able to leave the soaps unwrapped. Otherwise, you’ll have to wrap the soaps in cling foil or put them into little cello bags to prevent ‘sweating’ – moisture condensing on the soap.

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You can add these little treats to your Easter baskets, put them in little cello bags or use them as little decorations. I’ve added a few of the soaps into little plastic egg shells with a bit of coloured shredded paper. Do you think the kids will like it?

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Easter treats MP soap

  • Difficulty: Beginners
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Ingredients

  • white melt and pour base (I prefer low-sweat for this project)
  • soap dye or food colouring
  • fragrance or essential oil
  • Easter themed mold
  • 99% isopropyl alcohol

Directions

  1. Cut the white melt and pour soap base into small cubes and place in a heat proof Pyrex jug.
  2. Heat the soap base in the microwave on high in 10 second bursts until melted.
  3. Add a drop or two of soap dye or food colouring and stir. Add a drop more at a time until you have reached the desired colour.
  4. For each 1/2 cup of soap, add about 1/8 teaspoon (10-15 drops) of fragrance or essential oil, and stir well.
  5. Carefully pour the soap into the cavities of the soap mold, and spray with alcohol to get rid of all the bubbles.
  6. Leave to cool down and harden completely before unmolding. If you are using low-sweat melt and pour soap, you can leave them unwrapped, otherwise wrap them in cling foil or put them in little cello bags.

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Easter bath bomb chicks

Difficulty: Intermediate
Time: 1 hr
Yields: 6 bath bombs

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Easter doesn’t have to be all about chocolate, although I wouldn’t say no to chocolate, but it’s nice to get something different for a change. Especially if you have little ones, and they get more chocolate than they could (or should) ever eat! These Easter bath bomb chicks are easy and fun to make. They’re actually white bath bombs, which are then painted over with mica!

ONE: Using the standard 2:1 formula, add 2 cups of baking soda and 1 cup of citric acid to a bowl.

TWO: Melt 20 g of coconut oil in the microwave and add 20 ml of polysorbate 80. Add to the dry ingredients.

THREE: Next, add your chosen fragrance. I’m using pink grapefruit essential oil, which is a big favourite with kids. You can buy pink grapefruit essential oil from Pure Nature.

FOUR: Now mix all the ingredients together. Note that we’re not adding any colourant, instead we’ll be painting the chick later, so that we can leave the egg white. Another option would be to do it the other way round: make the bath bomb yellow and paint the egg white.


FIVE: If necessary, spritz the bath bomb mixture with witch hazel or water to get the right consistency. It should still be powdery, but if you squeeze it in you hand it should hold together. Once you have the right consistency, scoop the bath bomb mixture into your mold and press firmly to compact.

SIX: Let them dry in their molds for a few hours, then gently tap to remove them from their molds. Place them on a baking sheet and leave to harden completely overnight in a dry, warm place.

SEVEN: The following day, prepare the mica for painting. I’m using magic yellow mica, orange saffron mica, and dark purple mica. These are all available from Pure Nature.

Add 1/4 teaspoon of mica to 1 teaspoon of isopropyl alcohol and mix it to create a slurry.

EIGHT: Using a small paintbrush, paint the chick yellow, the beak orange and the eye purple.

NINE: Leave to dry for a few hours before packaging.

Easter Bath Bombs Chicks

  • Difficulty: intermediate
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Ingredients

  • 2 cups baking soda
  • 1 cup citric acid
  • 20 g coconut oil
  • 20 ml polysorbate 80
  • 10 ml pink grapefruit essential oil
  • Magic yellow mica
  • Orange saffron mica
  • Dark purple mica
  • Isopropyl alcohol

Directions

  1. Combine the baking soda and citric acid in a bowl.
  2. Melt 20 g of coconut oil in the microwave and mix with 20 ml polysorbate 80. Add to the dry ingredients.
  3. Add 10 ml pink grapefruit essential oil.
  4. Using your hands, mix everything together.
  5. If necessary, spritz with witch hazel or water to get the right consistency. Scoop the bath bomb mixture into the molds and firmly press to compact.
  6. Let them dry for a few hours, then tap to remove them from the mold. Leave to harden completely overnight.
  7. Prepare the mica, by adding 1/4 teaspoon of mica to 1 teaspoon of isopropyl alcohol and mix to create a slurry.
  8. Using a small paintbrush, paint the body of the chick yellow, the beak orange and its eye purple.
  9. Leave to dry for a few hours.