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Sparkly Christmas MP soaps

Difficulty: Beginners
Time:
1 hr
Yields: 9 small soaps

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Checking out the melt and pour starter kit from Pure Nature, I learned two things: one, they’re a great way to get you and/or your kids into soap making, because it contains everything you need and it’s actually a lot cheaper to buy the kit than the ingredients separately; and two, they contain these clamshell soap molds that act both as a mold and packaging at the same time. How handy is that? You pour the soap, let it cool down and harden, close the lid, and the soap is ready and packaged. The kit contains a whole block of white melt and pour soap base, fragrance and 9 of these clamshell molds.

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The sparkly Christmas soaps are a great starter project if you have a Pure Nature Melt and Pour Soap starter kit, but want do something a little bit more creative. In addition to the white melt and pour base and the fragrance that comes with the kit, you will also need clear melt and pour soap base, glitter, and a little chocolate mold of something Christmas themed. These you can get at $2 dollar shops, Spotlight, Look Sharp or the Warehouse.

Of course, you can make these soaps even if you don’t have the starter kit. In that case you will need 9 clamshell soap molds, in addition to the above ingredients (see full list of ingredients below).

PREPARATION: Cut up enough white melt and pour soap base to make 9 little soap embeds. Place them into a heat proof Pyrex jug and heat in the microwave in 20 second bursts until the soap has completely melted. Make sure you don’t bring the soap to boiling point. Pour the soap into the Christmas themed mold and spritz with some 99% isopropyl alcohol to get rid of the bubbles on the surface. Let the soap embeds harden and cool down completely before carefully removing them. Set aside for later use.

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ONE: Cut up 5-6 rows clear melt and pour soap base into small cubes and add to a heat proof Pyrex jug. Heat on high in the microwave in 20 second bursts, until the soap has melted.

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TWO: Add 1 teaspoon of fragrance and 1/4 teaspoon of glitter, and stir well.

Great Christmas fragrances to use are: Holly, Mistletoe, and Christmas Trees. Children  (and adults) love the Gingerbread fragrance. You can use essential oils for a natural option. Christmas blends usually include a combination of orange, pine, cinnamon, or peppermint essential oils.

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THREE: Pour the soap into mold, filling it up to about 2/3 of the mold. Carefully place an embed (bottom up!) in the centre and push it down, so that the soap covers it.

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FOUR: Spritz the surface with isopropyl alcohol to get rid of the bubbles.

Repeat with the other 8 molds.

Leave the soaps to firm up, so that you can pour the second layer. They ideal time to pour is when the soap is firm enough to support the next layer, without the hot, liquid soap pushing through the previous layer, but not completely solid.

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FIVE: Cut 2-3 rows of white melt and pour soap base, and again heat in microwave until melted.

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SIX: Check if the previous layer is solid enough by giving it a gentle push with the finger. If it gives way, but feels solid otherwise, it should be ok. Give the surface another quick spritz with alcohol, and then using a spoon, carefully ladle the melted white soap over the clear soap. Only fill the mold up to the ridge, otherwise you won’t be able to close the lid on it!

SEVEN: Let the soap cool down completely and harden before carefully putting the lids on. If you close the lids too soon, condensation will form inside the lids, which are a breeding ground for bacteria and mould!

If you decide to unmold the soaps, make sure you wrap them up! Glycerin soaps are prone to ‘sweating’ – collecting moisture on the surface.

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Sparkly Christmas soaps

  • Difficulty: beginners
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Ingredients

  • melt and pour soap kit from Pure Nature
  • clear melt and pour soap base
  • glitter
  • Christmas themed chocolate mold or ice cube mold
  • 99% isopropyl alcohol

OR

  • white melt and pour soap base
  • clear melt and pour soap base
  • fragrance
  • glitter
  • 9 clamshell soap molds
  • Christmas themed chocolate mold or ice cube mold
  • 99% isopropyl alcohol

Directions

Prepare the embeds: Cut up enough white melt and pour soap base and heat in the microwave in 20 second bursts until melted. Pour into the chocolate mold, spritz with 99% isopropyl alcohol and let the embeds cool down and harden completely before removing.

  1. Cut 5-6 rows of clear melt and pour soap base into small cubes and place in a heat proof Pyrex jug.
  2. Heat the soap base in the microwave on high in 20 second bursts until melted.
  3. Add 1 teaspoon of fragrance and 1/4 teaspoon of glitter and stir well.
  4. Pour into the mold until about 2/3 filled.
  5. Carefully push an embed (bottom up!) into the soap, so that the soap covers it.
  6. Spritz with 99% isopropyl alcohol to get rid of the bubbles.
  7. Repeat with the other 8 molds.
  8. Leave to firm up so that it can support the next layer, but hasn’t solidified completely yet.
  9. Cut up 2-3 rows of white melt and pour soap base, and again heat in microwave until melted.
  10. Before pouring, spritz the surface of the clear soap with alcohol again, and then using a spoon, carefully ladle the white soap over the clear soap. Don’t fill past the ridge in the mold.
  11. Spritz the surface again with alcohol to get rid of the bubbles.
  12. Fill the other 8 molds.
  13. Leave the soap to cool down and harden completely before closing the lid.
  14. Add a little label and your soap is finished!

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Jolly soaps

Difficulty: Beginners
Time:
1 hr
Yields: 4 bars of soap

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With this soap, I wanted to catch a bit of the fun and silliness there is at Christmas. Think silly Christmas hats, Secret Santa and Bad Santa (something I only found out about this year!), terrible jokes and a bit of fun and cheer. Christmas is all about getting together and enjoying each other’s company. My favourite is always the Christmas crackers, and even though the jokes are starting to get old, we still all read them out loud and put on the silly hats.

These Jolly Soaps are quick and easy to make and the perfect Secret Santa or Bad Santa gift. Or get the kids to make them as Teacher’s Gifts. You only need white and clear melt and pour soap base, green and red food colouring, and Holly Berry fragrance. As a mold, you can either use the small square mold from Pure Nature, or you can use a small plastic container of similar size.

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ONE: Cut the clear melt and pour soap base into small cubes and add to a heat proof Pyrex jug. Heat on high in the microwave in 20 second bursts, until the soap has melted. Try to avoid the soap from reaching boiling point!

TWO: Add 1/2 teaspoon of fragrance and stir well.

THREE: Pour half of the melted soap base into a separate container.

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FOUR: Add 2-3 drops of green food colouring to one container and 2-3 drops of red food colouring to the other container, and  give both a good stir.

If you choose to use a different fragrance, make sure they are safe to use on skin. This is particular important when using candle fragrances. Not all candle fragrances are suitable for use in body care products and soap. So don’t forget to read the safety data of the fragrances you intend to use, or check back with the supplier.

FIVE: Pour the two colours into two small containers and let them cool down and harden.

I used my square cavity mold, but you can use a disposable cup, yoghurt bottles or a little plastic container. It doesn’t really matter what shape it is, because you’ll be cutting these up later.

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SIX: Once the two soaps have completely cooled down and hardened, unmold them, and cut them into smaller shapes. Try and vary the shapes: cubes, long, triangles, pyramid-shaped etc.

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SEVEN: Next, cut the white melt and pour soap base and place it in a heat proof Pyrex jug. Melt on high in the microwave in 20 second bursts until melted.

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EIGHT: Add 1/2 teaspoon of fragrance and give it a good stir.

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NINE: Pour about 1/3 of the white soap into the soap mold.

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TEN: Place some of the green and red shapes into the white soap, and let it stand for a few minutes to set a little.

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ELEVEN: Pour some more white soap and add some more shapes, and keep doing this until the soap and shapes have been used up. Between each pour, let the soap set a little. Should the white soap become too thick to pour, re-melt it in the microwave.

You can either finish off with a white layer of soap, or you can let some of the shapes stick out of the white soap for a more funkier look!

TWELVE: Let the soap cool down completely and harden before carefully unmolding. Remember, melt and pour soap bases contain a lot of glycerin and the soaps will sweat (attract moisture) in humid conditions, so they will need to be wrapped (Glad Wrap or cello bags).

PLEASE NOTE BECAUSE WE ARE USING FOOD COLOURING THE COLOURS WILL BLEED INTO THE WHITE OVER TIME. 

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Jolly soaps

  • Difficulty: beginners
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Ingredients

  • approx. 250 g each of white and clear melt and pour soap base
  • red and green food colouring
  • Holly Berry fragrance from Candlescience
  • 2 small containers of about 125 ml volume each
  • small square soap mold of 500 ml volume

Directions

  1. Cut the clear melt and pour soap base into small cubes and place in a heat proof Pyrex jug.
  2. Heat the soap base in the microwave on high in 20 second bursts until melted.
  3. Add 1/2 teaspoon of fragrance and stir well.
  4. Pour about half of the soap into a separate container.
  5. Add 2-3 drops of red food colouring to one container, and 2-3 drops of green food colouring to the other container, and give both soaps a good stir.
  6. Pour the soaps into 2 small containers and let cool down and harden.
  7. Unmold and cut the green and red soap into small random blocks and shapes. Set aside.
  8. Cut the white melt and pour soap base into small cubes and melt in the microwave as before (points 1 and 2).
  9. Add 1/2 teaspoon of fragrance and stir well.
  10. Pour about 1/3 of the white soap into the square soap mold.
  11. Place some of the red and green shapes into the white soap, and let set a little.
  12. Continue alternating pouring the white soap base and placing the shapes, and letting it set a little in-between each pour, until all the soap and shapes have been used up.
  13. Leave the soap to cool down and harden completely before unmolding.
  14. Package the soaps into little cello bags or glad wrap.

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Candy cane swirl melt and pour

Difficulty: Beginners
Time: 30 mins
Yields: approximately 500 g of soap or 4 bars of soap

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The consistency of melt and pour soap bases doesn’t allow for the same swirling techniques you can use in cold process soaps. Still, it is possible to get some really cool swirling effects using both white and clear melt and pour soap bases. The trick behind the swirling technique used in this soap is using both clear and white soap bases and pouring them at different temperatures. As the white and clear soaps cool, they will have a different consistencies, allowing for a swirling effect. The temperature difference is important, because is we were to pour both the white and clear soaps at the same temperature (= consistency), the clear and white soaps would just blend into each other and the result would be one solid pastel pink colour, instead of swirls.

The mold I’m using is the small square silicon mold from Pure Nature, which is ideal for melt and pour projects like this. It holds about 500 g, giving you 4 bars of soap.

Pure Nature also stocks several types of melt and pour soap bases. For this project I used the normal white base and clear base. If you wish to leave your soap unwrapped, I recommend using the low-sweat white base and low-sweat clear base.

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ONE: Cut up approximately 250 g of white melt and pour soap base into cubes and add it to a heat proof glass Pyrex jug. Heat on high in the microwave in 20 second bursts until the soap has melted. Make sure you don’t bring the soap to boil.

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TWO: Add 1 teaspoon peppermint essential oil and give it a good stir.

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THREE: Pour a layer of about 1 cm of white soap into your soap mold.

FOUR: Cut up approximately 250 g of the clear melt and pour soap and add it to a separate heat proof glass Pyrex jug and again, heat on high in the microwave in 20 second bursts until melted.

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FIVE: Add 1 teaspoon of peppermint essential oil and 2-3 drops of red food colouring. Give the soap a good stir until you have an even colour throughout the soap.

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SIX: Pour about a third of the red soap into the mold from a height of about 20-30 cm, making sure you break through the surface of the white soap.

SEVEN: Using a spoon, give it a little swirl.

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EIGHT: Wait a few minutes, and then pour in some of the white soap and give it another quick swirl. Wait again for a few minutes. Keep repeating this, alternating between pouring red and white soap until you have used up all the soap.

If the soap should set in the jugs, heat them up briefly in the microwave to melt again.

There are no set rules for swirling melt and pour soap, so feel free to play around. Try pouring from different heights, or pouring different consistencies of soap, some a bit thicker and some more fluid. Swirl when the soap is a bit thicker, or don’t swirl at all and let the soap do the movement for you. You can even plop in a few unmelted blocks of soap.

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NINE: Once you’ve poured all the soap and you’re happy with the swirling, sprinkle some gold bio-glitter on the surface.

TEN: Let the soap cool down and harden completely before unmolding. I usually leave it overnight, and unmold the next morning. Cut the soap into 4 bars and wrap in glad wrap or place them in cello bags. The soaps contain a high amount of glycerin, which draws moisture to its surface, especially in a humid climate like we have in New Zealand. To prevent this, we wrap the soaps.

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Candy cane swirl melt and pour

  • Difficulty: beginners
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Ingredients

  • 250g white melt and pour soap base
  • 250g clear melt and pour soap base
  • 10 ml peppermint essential oil
  • red food colouring
  • gold bio-glitter
  • small square soap mold

Directions

  1. Cut 250 g of white melt and pour soap base into cubes and add it to a heat proof Pyrex jug and heat on high in the microwave in 20 second bursts or until melted.
  2. Add 1 teaspoon of peppermint essential oil.
  3. Pour approximately a layer of 1 cm into the soap mold.
  4. Repeat steps 1 and 2 for the clear melt and pour soap base.
  5. Add 2-3 drops of red food colouring to the clear melt and pour soap base and stir until the colour has evenly dispersed throughout the soap.
  6. From a height of about 20-30 cm, pour about a third of the red soap into the mold, making sure you break through the surface of the white soap.
  7. Using a spoon, give the soap a swirl.
  8. Wait a few minutes, then pour some of the white soap into the soap mold. Give it another swirl, and wait for a few minutes. Keep repeating this, alternating between the red and white soap, until you have used up all the soap.
  9. Give the soap a final swirl.
  10. Sprinkle a little gold glitter over the surface.
  11. Leave the soap to cool down and harden completely (or overnight).
  12. The next day, carefully unmold the soap and cut into 4 bars.
  13. Wrap the soap into glad wrap or in cello bags.

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Christmas soaps

Difficulty: Beginners
Time: 30 mins
Yields: approx. 20 small soaps

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It’s Christmas soon! Are you ready yet? Or are you like me, right in the middle of trying to get everything done in time? You should see my kitchen, it is one big chaos and dinners consist of BBQ and salads at the moment while the soap making has taken over the kitchen.

Here’s a little project that is quick and easy to make and doesn’t need a lot of extra ingredients. Something that you can do last minute, because these cute little soaps will be ready to gift in a couple of hours. They make great stocking fillers. Or how about getting the kids to make their own Christmas gifts this year? Something for nana, granddad, family, friends… All you need is some clear melt and pour soap base, food colouring, fragrance, some glitter, and these cute Christmassy soap molds that I found at the Warehouse for $3 each.

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The instructions are based on 2 molds of each, two Christmas tree molds (green) and two Christmas presents (red) molds. I did the little green Christmas trees first, and then repeated the whole process for the little red presents.

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ONE: To prepare, sprinkle some glitter into each cavity of the mold. Pure Nature has these great bio-glitters that are not only safe to use on skin, but are also bio-degradable and sourced from renewable raw materials. You can also use other glitters, but do be aware that they are usually made plastic.

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TWO: Cut approximately 2 rows of clear melt and pour soap base into small cubes and add to a heat proof Pyrex jug. Heat on high in the microwave in 20 second bursts, until the soap has melted. Try to avoid the soap from reaching boiling point!

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THREE: Once your soap base is completely melted, add 3-4 drops of green food colouring, and  give it a good stir.

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FOUR: Add approximately 15-20 drops of fragrance, and stir the soap until the colour and the fragrance has been thoroughly dispersed throughout the soap.

For the Christmas trees, I used the aptly named Christmas tree fragrance from Candlescience, which has a fresh Christmassy scent, and for the Christmas presents I used the delicious, sweet Holly Berry fragrance from Candlescience. I love both fragrances, because although they do remind you of Christmas, they’re not the usual standard fragrances, that everyone seems to use for their Christmas soaps.

When you choose your fragrance, make sure they are safe to use on skin. This is particular important when using candle fragrances. Not all candle fragrances are suitable for use in body care products and soap. So don’t forget to read the safety data of the fragrances you intend to use, or check back with the supplier.

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FIVE: Pour into your mold, and spritz with 99% isopropyl alcohol (optional) to get rid of any bubbles on the surface.

Let the soaps cool down completely and harden before carefully unmolding. Remember, melt and pour soap bases contain a lot of glycerin and the soaps will sweat (attract moisture) in humid conditions, so they will need to be wrapped (Glad Wrap or cello bags).

REPEAT WITH OTHER MOLDS

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Christmas soaps

  • Difficulty: beginners
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Ingredients

  • approx. 1/2 kg clear melt and pour soap base
  • red and green food colouring
  • Christmas Tree and Holly Berry fragrance from Candlescience
  • glitter
  • 99% isopropyl alcohol (optional)
  • Christmas tree and Christmas present molds from the Warehouse

Directions

  1. Sprinkle a little glitter into each cavity of the mold.
  2. Cut the soap into small cubes and place in a heat proof Pyrex jug.
  3. Heat the soap base in the microwave on high in 20 second bursts until melted.
  4. Add 3-4 drops of food colouring and stir.
  5. Add 15-20 drops fragrance and stir well.
  6. Pour the soap into  your soap mold and leave to set and harden before unmolding.
  7. Package the soaps into little cello bags or glad wrap.

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Dog soap for sensitive skin

Difficulty: Beginners
Time: 30 mins
Yields: 6 small soaps

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Skin pH is a tricky thing. And while certain ingredients used in soaps and shampoos might be great for our skin and hair, it doesn’t mean it’s also good for our canine friends and can cause itching, flakiness and be generally irritating to a dog.

Human skin has a pH level on the acidic side, around 5.5, which helps us combat germs and infection on our skin. Dogs, however, have a much more neutral skin pH, between 6.5 and 8, which is why it so important to use the right products for dogs as not to irritate their skin.

I always test a soap or any product that is designated for use on dogs. Since soaps have a tendency to be slightly more alkaline, a good trick is to add citric acid. One teaspoon of citric acid to 1000 g of soap can bring the pH down approximately by 0.5. So you don’t need much.

This recipe is formulated especially for sensitive skins, with colloidal oatmeal, castor oil and a special blend of essential oils, all which help restore, balance and soothe sensitive skins.

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ONE: Cut the soap into small cubes and add them to a heat proof Pyrex jug. Heat on high in the microwave in 20 second bursts, until the soap has melted. Try to avoid the soap from reaching boiling point!

I am using shea butter melt and pour soap base, because shea butter is great for dry and sensitive skins and helps balance and nourish the skin. Alternatively, you can also use the triple butter melt and pour soap base, which is more nourishing, or the SLS-free white melt and pour base, for very sensitive skins.

TWO: Add two teaspoons of colloidal oatmeal and a sprinkle of citric acid (just a teeny tiny amount) to 1 teaspoon of castor oil, and mix well, and then add the mixture to the soap. (In the picture I added the oatmeal directly to the soap, and as you can see it has formed clumps, which despite whisking furiously, I couldn’t make disappear). Oatmeal has been used throughout time to soothe dry, irritated and inflamed skin. In addition, it is also full of skin-loving vitamins and minerals, which help nourish the skin. I’m also adding castor oil, which is also known to help restore skin’s moisture balance and helps promote a healthy, shiny coat.

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THREE: Lastly add this special blend of essential oils, which soothes and calms sensitive skin, and helps fight off germs and infection and also acts as a flea-repellent:

  • 10 drops lavender essential oil
  • 5 drops peppermint essential oil
  • 5 drops tea tree essential oil

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FOUR: Give everything a good stir to ensure everything is well dispersed throughout the soap and then pour it into your mold. I’m using little paw molds that I found on AliExpress. Leave the soaps to harden for a few hours before unmolding. Make sure you package these soaps into little cello bags or glad wrap, because these melt and pour soap bases attract humidity and little beads of moisture will form on the surface if not properly packaged.

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Dog soap for sensitive skin

  • Difficulty: beginners
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Ingredients

  • 240g shea butter melt and pour soap base
  • 2 teaspoon colloidal oatmeal
  • 1 teaspoon castor oil
  • citric acid
  • 10 drops lavender essential oil
  • 5 drops peppermint essential oil
  • 5 drops tea tree essential oil

Directions

  1. Cut the soap into small cubes and place in a heat proof Pyrex jug.
  2. Heat the soap base in the microwave on high in 20 second bursts until melted.
  3. Add 2 teaspoon of colloidal oatmeal, and a sprinkle of citric acid to 1 teaspoon of castor oil, and add the mixture to the melted soap.
  4. Add the essential oils and give everything a good stir to mix thoroughly into the soap.
  5. Pour the soap into  your soap mold and leave to set and harden before unmolding.
  6. Package the soap into little cello bags or glad wrap.